Writing quote: “There are no laws for the novel. There never have been, nor can there ever be.”

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 “There are no laws for the novel. There never have been, nor can there ever be.” – Doris Lessing 

If anyone ever ever told you that you can only write in a certain way they are not speaking the truth. 

Writing novels should never look like a chore or bore you because you do not have to follow a particular pattern or write like another novelist to get your own audience.

That’s the thing about them; the more creative your novel is the better for all of us. You set the laws for your novel – how you want it to start, progress and how you want it to end. As long as it makes sense to your readers the rest of the world has no choice but to go with it. Novelist write stories that they wish they could find on the shelf, stories that keep circling in their head, the ones that make them smile in the midst of a large audience. 

Writing novels and following ‘rules’ will restrict you. As long as you are a writer you must commit to giving your best to your readers every time you pick up a pen. No excuses, no going back. 

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#GrammarSeries – What’s the big deal with grammar?

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What’s all these grammar talk we read every Tuesday on The Sparkle Writer’s Hub? What’s the big deal? Grammar is actually pretty important and if you’ve ever wondered why we keep insisting that you follow the Grammar series on Tuesday, this will convince you. 

Imagine if we all just talked and nobody understood the next person because each person decided to go with his or her own grammar rules? What will happen to the world? Definitely a lot of chaos. 

The reason that the rules of grammar exist is to give all speakers of the same language a playbook to make sure that they understand each other.

If you decided one day to stop pluralizing anything and just use the singular form for everything, that’s great for your personal journaling or expression. Most other English speakers will need some guidance if they have to read and understand what you wrote. 

Some might argue that rules are made to be broken. In the case of writing, bending some of the rules can be a form of expression. However, rules should not be broken for the sake of breaking them. You’re not going to keep the attention of an audience if they have to struggle to make sense of what you’ve written.

#PickOfTheWeek – Candid truth from amazing writers

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It’s #PickOfTheWeek and we have four amazing writers today! We can’t wait for you to read from them. 

The first writer is Ugo Udoji we understand the place from which this comes from. Sometimes its so hard to forgive yourself when you make those silly mistakes but then we just have to. 

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Temilorun Adebiyi’s post is next. The way he describes love just makes us want to experience it from his perspective . Let us know what you think! 

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 Ipinlaye Mercy Olajumoke hits the nail on the head with this one. If everyone can take this stand the world would be a safer place to live in. 

farmto table (2)Ekene May’s charge to us is one that everyone needs to take seriously. We must ensure that we live our lives to the fullest. 

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If you are a writer and you post your work on Instagram, don’t forget to forget to tag @thesparklewritershub for a chance to be featured on our Pick of the Week.

#WritingQuote – Writing is an exploration, you start from nothing and learn as you go

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The notion new writers have that they need to know all there is to know (as if that’s even possible) about writing before they call themselves writers is so wrong and honestly pretty much unrealistic.

No one knows all there is to know about writing. We all just continue to explore our abilities, learn new things and increase our capabilities. 

Ask anyone who is on a roll in this profession, they do a whole lot of exploring and trying out new things. If you are hesitant to do this you will not go very far and that’s the honest truth. 

So explore and improve yourself daily. 

#PickOfTheWeek – Nigeria, Time and Darkness, this week’s posts are different

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This week’s posts for #PickOfTheWeek are quite profound and thought-provoking. We admire all the writers for the depth of each piece. 

Our first feature is one that honours our dear country, Nigeria! If you are not from here this piece will help you appreciate us better. We really are dope! Thank you so much, Igbor Clement, for this. 

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The second piece by Nmesoma Agbo is all about domestic abuse and reminds people of how brutal it really is. Nobody should go through it. 

farmto table (1)Adegbite Tomi reminds us about how important it is to manage time do ALL we need to do every day. 

farmto table (2)The last and definitely not the least is a piece about the impact of building lives. No matter how much wealth we acquire. We really can never be truly successful if we don’t build people. Thank you so much, Andrew. 

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If you would like to be featured on Pick of the Week, don’t forget to tag @thesparklewritershub on Instagram.

#GrammarSeries: Commas and Quotations – The do’s and don’ts

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Most of us use commas to introduce quotations which is not wrong. This is because, in most types of dialogue, the quoted material stands apart from the surrounding text. In grammatical terms, it’s “syntactically independent.” 

You can use commas when a quotation is interrupted by a phrase like, “he said” or “she said.” In fact, you use two commas. For example;

“What the king dreams,” [Ned] said, “the Hand builds.”

“Bran,” [Jon] said, “I’m sorry I didn’t come before.”

In certain cases, you can skip the comma when introducing a quotation. 

First, skip the comma if the quotation is introduced by a conjunction like “that,” “whether,” or “if.” Following that guidance, you might write sentences like this:

My sister is constantly reminding people that “winter is coming.” 

Mr Chris  wonders whether “we’ve grown so used to horror we assume there’s no other way.”

My teacher said that “a mind needs books like a sword needs a whetstone.” 

Second, ask yourself whether the quotation blends into the rest of the sentence—or, speaking grammatically, if it’s a syntactical part of the surrounding sentence. If the quotation blends in, the comma comes out. 

Here are two examples:

It was the third time he had called her “boy.” “I’m a girl,” Arya objected.

Fat Tom used to call her “Sara Underfoot” because he said that was where she always was.

 

 

#WritingQuote – Writers are like dancers, athletes. Without that exercise, the muscles seize up.

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Exercise the writing muscle every day, even if it is only a letter, notes, a title list, a character sketch, a journal entry. Writers are like dancers, like athletes. Without that exercise, the muscles seize up. Jane Yolen, Author of Owl Moon.

Today’s author whose quote we are focusing on today is top notch. Jane Yolen is the prolific author of children’s books and science fiction and has written well over 300 books. Trust us when we say this author is phenomenal. And she advises other writers, including you reading this right now, to exercise the writing muscle. Her advice is definitely valid based on what she has accomplished in her lifetime as a writer.

What you write about does not matter. All that matters is that you write not just weekly or monthly but every single day. Think about it. If an athlete forsakes his daily exercise routine for as long as a month, it would tell on his ability to run or jump properly. Usain Bolt would not be all that exceptional if he was not actively involved in daily exercising his muscles.

There is no shortcut to being a terrific writer. Writing daily is the surest way.

So, dear writer, just write. No matter what the subject of your writing is about, just write your way into excellence every single day. Do not allow your writing muscle seize up and get all rusty.

                  

 

#WordOfTheDay – Uberty means…

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It is indeed fascinating how that the deletion of a particular letter from a word can change the entire meaning of the word forever. If you delete the letter ‘p’ from the word ‘puberty,’ you are going to get the word ‘uberty’ which is our word for today. And the meaning of ‘uberty’ is not even remotely related to the word ‘puberty.’

Uberty is a noun pronounced as /ju:b∂ti/. It is used to mean abundance or fruitfulness. It originated from the Latin word uber (rich, fruitful, abundant).

Here is how it is used in a sentence.

“Uberty comes from uncompromising strife or drive to achieve superior outcomes for the relationships.”

 

What’s the big deal about creativity?

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Today, we are going to talk about something very crucial; something you cannot do without as a writer and that is creativity. Ever been to an art exhibition or a book reading? What is it that you appreciate about these events – yeah, the CREATIVITY. You appreciate the creativity in each of the paintings or the creativity in the way the writer of the book has crafted the words in such a manner as to convey his message in a succinct and striking way. Creativity has an uncanny ability to pull the reader into your world has a writer. Creativity is a transformational skill that writers should not leave behind in their writing. Make conscious efforts to be creative.

Creativity has an uncanny ability to pull the reader into your world has a writer. Creativity is a transformational skill that writers should not leave behind in their writing. Make conscious efforts to be creative.

For a moment here, we would like to define what it means to be creative. Creativity is not necessarily writing words that have never been written before. Rather, it is saying the same thing in a novel way such that your readers can see the same picture they have always seen from a different perspective.

One way in which writers can be creative is in the infusion of metaphors in their writing. Well, for those who are not very familiar with literature and what figures of speech are all about, metaphors are ways of making strong comparisons between two often unrelated concepts. So, for example, if you want to describe the concept of Love, for instance, you might say that LOVE IS A BATTLE. Here, you are comparing the abstract concept of love with the physical concept of a battle so that your audience will immediately get your ideological point of view of what Love is to you in particular.

Creativity could also occur in diverse ways such as the manner of ordering or the arranging your words in your narrative or in any piece of writing; it is using the same words in such a way that it causes your audience to see things from another perspective and if possible have an epiphany.

We do hope that this article will help you get your creative juices flowing.

#Writing Quote – “A writer who waits for ideal conditions under which to work will die without putting a word on paper”

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“A writer who waits for ideal conditions under which to work will die without putting a word on paper” – E.B White, Author of Stuart Little

The harsh truth is that there will never be “ideal conditions” to write the way you have fantasized about writing. There will always be challenges you have to face. These challenges are what makes your story as a writer interesting.

There will never be perfect conditions for writing that book you have always wanted to write. Ask writers who have successfully published a book. Yeah, we know you want to develop yourself and hone your writing skills so you can put words together perfectly, we know you want to wait till you get that brand new laptop you have been waiting for, we know you want to wait till you own a website before writing. And all of these things are good. However, do not make them your excuses for not writing.

Seriously dear writer, time is ticking. And even if you get all of these things you so crave for, something else will come up and it will be an endless cycle of waiting until you realize that you and time are no longer buddies.

Today’s quote is spot on. Stop waiting for ideal conditions. That is a mirage. Start with what you have right now (yes, even if it is just a pen and a paper); start where you are, and let the words flow out of your heart.