Here’s why you should guest blog

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Last week, we mentioned that managing a blog can be difficult. We know someone is wondering why we are tying to add to your work load by asking you to guest blog. 

It’s because you need it for your personal and corporate brand (if you have one) to grow.

Guest blogging is simple (well depending on how you look at it). It entails writing for another blog in your niche area. 

Want to know why it is pretty important? Keep reading.

You would increase your visibility 

Getting noticed, especially for a new website, is very difficult. Becoming a contributor to popular and highly revered websites and blogs in your niche will give you the visibility that you crave and you will get the chance to introduce yourself to a wider audience. Isn’t that amazing? 

Traffic on your own blog will increase 

Aside from getting your website in front of an established audience and potentially sending you referral traffic, you get a link back which is gold and impacts your SEO positively. Please note that guest blogging on websites with low-quality could negatively impact your website instead of helping you grow and increase your organic traffic. So choose wisely. 

You can establish yourself as an authority 

Every writer or blogger who means business must strive to become an authority in his or her niche, consistently blogging on other sites apart from yours will help increase your authority brag rights, if there’s something like that but you get what we mean. 

While the concept of guest blogging is easy enough, it’s definitely going to take some manual work and time to find results. This means going to Google, searching for sites that allow guest blogging, building relationships with those sites, and then creating high-quality content for each of those sites. All the best!


#WriterSpotlight – ‘If you’re serious about writing – as a life skill and not just “I wanna be popular” just write, and read and write some more.’ Atoke

Hey Sparkle Writers! Guess who we have on #WriterSpotlight today? It’s Atoke! If you have not heard about her before (where have you been really), be prepared to be blown away because this is by far one of the most refreshing interviews we have had in recent times. She talks about how she started her journey as a writer and hurdles she had while self publishing her book! 


Hello Atoke. Please tell us about yourself.

I’m a Yoruba woman who thinks about everything that happens around her, and writes about those thoughts. I’m a TV dependent, and this is very important to the question of who I am; it’s crucial. I’m also a reader and a lover of words. I’m 4’11 and I say this everywhere, just in case if anyone erroneously thinks I’m 5ft tall.

Take us through your journey as a writer. How did you begin?

I started writing at my desk while I worked in a law firm in Lagos. Mostly, I complained about traffic (which is why I had the chance to write anyway). I wrote about how much I dreaded having to drive home from Lekki after a long ass day. So, the more I was frustrated by Lagos life (including okada riders who groped my ass) and my job at the time, the more I wrote. I blogged at the time at and it was my safe space. “Here, There & Back” was my home to talk about what it meant to be a lawyer in Lagos, barely keeping it together mentally.

You had a weekly Column at BellaNaija for three years. Can you please tell us how that opportunity opened up for you and what impact it has had on your journey as a writer?

I work as Features Editor of BellaNaija and it is one of my core duties to create and curate content. So I had all sorts of things going on at the time: BN HotTopic, BN Our Stories Our Miracles, BN Making It, BN Prose… and I wrote all of these things hiding in the shadows – without my name on it. So, one day Uche Pedro called me into her office and she said, “When I hired you, you said you liked to write. You spoke so passionately about wanting to write using your voice.” I told her it was because I was terrified nobody would like what I had to say. I started, in spite of the fear and I made sure I remained consistent, even when it felt like I was running out of steam. It became a project I was determined to do…. Just to prove to myself that I could do it.

So to your question about whether it has impacted my journey as a writer, it’s a yes and a no. Yes, in terms of the fact that people know my writing because of the platform and I look at some old pieces and cringe at the framing of the narrative. Some of the writing is actually quite poor, if I look at it from my self-critiquing lens, today. No, because my journey as a writer has not really begun. So, we’ll see what the future holds.

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Congratulations on your recently published book, ‘An Awkward Guide To Being Nigerian’. Where did the inspiration for the book come from?

I’d like to take credit for the inspiration for this book so badly, but once again this is Uche’s baby. She pushed and pushed and pushed. “Write it. Do it. Just do it.” So, eventually, I buckled and I did. Way to go, BossBae!

The book is a collection of essays that are quite profound. Which of the essays in the book resonates with you the most and why?

The Stare Factor – the one about disabilities in Nigeria because I talked to so many people about their thoughts on disability and the responses were quite heart-breaking. It’s not even something I really thought that deeply about until I got to Swansea and there was a paraplegic in my class and his stories were THE BOMB DIGGIDY! He had a helper who assisted him and that was his second Masters degree. I started thinking about the abled person’s privilege and how we don’t even public transportation to cater for people in wheel chairs, or people who are deaf/blind. Once I entered that rabbit hole, I absolutely had to write about it.

Why was it important for you to release this book at the point when you did?

Because it was on my to-do list for the whole of 2016 and adulting kept getting in the way. So , I was determined that 2017 must not end without that book coming out of my computer, and I achieved my goals.

For anyone who has never heard about the book, why should they get a copy and what pertinent questions does the book provide answers to?

They should get the book because I wrote it, dammit! Just kidding! Seriously though, you should buy AND read +234- An Awkward Guide to Being Nigerian because it’s the book that tries to encapsulate issues that plague us as Nigerians –both at home and abroad. Also, I don’t just continue to drone on about our problems, because we all know what they are. I attempt to provide functional and practical solutions.

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Nigerian is a country with many tribes and cultures embedded within. How were you able to capture the diversity and uniqueness of being Nigerian in your book?

This was very difficult because I’m a number one ambassador of the fact that there’s no monolithic culture called “Nigerian.” There’s nothing like Nigerian language, or Nigerian culture stricto sensu; I think I addressed this in the chapter about identity, and how we identify. For instance, I identify primarily as Yoruba. It’s hard to capture the diversity and uniqueness at the same time. So how did I do it? Honestly, me sef I don’t know.

Since the book was released, what has the reception and the reviews been like?

So far so good. There’s been a lot of sentimental purchases, like “Oh Atoke wrote a book, I loved her column, let me buy her book.” Then they don’t read it immediately and I’m sitting here in my house like yepa, did they not give feedback because it sucked? So there’s that which I am grateful for because people are buying, but the real jig is I want people to read it, digest it, talk about it, and tell their circles to buy. Give it as gifts at parties, because hey, we love parties and if we want Nigeria to change for the better, we need our party goers to read my book.

Reviews so far have been good – again, I’m not sure if that’s because Atoke’s column was very successful or because they really liked the book. I’ll take the good notion; helps me sleep better at night. I have, however seen one negative review – and it’s been the only one. The person said they were tired of fake laughter and the book was over hyped.  I didn’t even know the book was hyped, I was here thinking gosh, I want people to read my book and hype it. So that was kinda good(ish)?


Let’s talk about the process of writing the book and getting it published. What challenges did you face and how were you able to overcome them?

Plenty challenges oh! Do you have all day?

Okay, so I’m self published. Which is something I never ever wanted to be because I’m a snob and I always lowkey side eyed self-published writers. But when I spent the entire 2016 and 2017 writing to agents and publishers and collecting my Ls, I respected myself and entered on Google, “how to get your book published”

I had a LOT of help. Got my book designed by a sister-friend, Segun Akeredolu; got the book edited by Uche Okonkwo and Renette Igharo (because I wanted the best people who knew ME, understood my personality and my writing but also had the credentials under their belt).

Then, I went on to get a layout guy (Shout out to Abi Dare for telling me not to fret, the guys on Fiverr are good, just read the reviews). Then, when I didn’t understand the lingo for taxes and how to get it on Amazon, Yejide Kilanko (Amazing writer!!!!! Yes, include all those exclamation marks), she allayed my fears on the documentation I required to sort out Amazon. Then when I was worried about piracy and whether to print in Nigeria, she (Yejide) said,”Listen, you can’t avoid that if your book becomes wildly successful.” So, I calmed down and stopped being a diva, in that respect.

Finally, I printed in Nigeria because Arese Ugwu recommended Mr. Lekan in Somolu and the quality is great (even though I haven’t used my two eyes to see it)

It was very challenging but I’ve had a LOT of help and support. My family and friends, they’re the absolute best. Before I say “mo need…” they’ve actioned it.

Have you ever experienced writer’s block in your journey as a writer? If yes, please share some tips on how you were able to overcome it.

Writer’s block is standard. But if you have a deadline, I found that coffee and shutting out Twitter helps me push through. I’m a Twitter addict. God help me! So distracting but oh so sweet!

What’s the one thing you love most about being a writer?

Will it not sound one kain if I’m honest, bayi? The fact that when I say it at airports it gets people asking more questions. Always gets people asking more.

“Does it pay your rent?” is one of the most common ones, to which I respond, I strip to make up the balance. Since we all want to be asking about each other’s finances.

In your opinion, why is it important for people to write and share the message they have in their hearts?

Because shared experiences go a long way. It doesn’t even matter what form it takes, you just might stop someone who’s planning to go kill themselves. You can give someone hope. Optimism is such a big thing. It saves lives.

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What tips do you have for someone out there who wants to become a published author but does not yet have the financial capacity to do so?

Write, continue to write and put the body of work together.  Have it, and advertise snippets on your blog or Medium. Have a strong voice and actually have the skill to write. Writing is a skill, not a lot of people have it.  There’s so many badly written/published books. I don’t think money or financial capacity is the thing. I didn’t spend a dime to have my book published on Amazon. Have a body of work, as long as you have the Internet, do your research. Hone your craft. Mix with other writers, have them read your work. Read theirs as well. (Because some people will send 12 articles for you to review for them – as if you don’t have work that you were doing) If you’re a writer, serious about writing, hone your skills. Learn about the nuances of writing. Write on Medium, write on your blog. Write well (by this I mean properly). Look at Elnathan John (my writing hero), he wrote consistently on his blog, was very noisy on Twitter, had his own unique style… I can go on and on about how ElJo is Bae but you will chase me away.

My point is so many people say things like “I want to write, how do I start” errrr, just write. There’s a lot of free materials on the internet. When I started getting serious about writing, I went on Twitter and searched for Nigerian writers and followed every single one of them. Then I attended a creative writing workshop organized by Red Media (it was 5k, but I didn’t pay because when I got there. They just said oya sit down let’s teach you). I also met so many fantastic writers on Twitter – again it was a symbiotic relationship. I read and reviewed their work, they read and reviewed mine.  

So, yeah to answer your question… if you’re serious about writing – as a life skill and not just “I wanna be popular” (which doesn’t pay rent by the way… I know this) just write, and read and write some more.


#WritingQuote – There is no rule on how to write


There is no rule on how to write. Sometimes it comes easily and perfectly; sometimes it’s like drilling rock and then blasting it out with charges. Ernest Hemingway

This is sooo true! New writers often want to know what the rules of writing are; the do’s and don’ts and as much as we’d like to reel out a ‘writing constitution’ full of the ways and manners you should write, there really isn’t any. 

There are times you’d pick up your pen or open a Microsoft document and the words would come out effortlessly! If only those days could be a bit more frequent. Other times you could stare at your computer for hours and nothing comes; it is part of the process. It doesn’t make you less of a writer and doesn’t mean you don’t have a message. 

Every writer must know this and be ready to go all the way when these dry periods come. Instead of folding your hands at this period, write – write about the fact that you have nothing to write.

Just make sure you write because that’s what writers do! 

#WordOfTheDay – This is what hoax means

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If you have been following our #WordOfTheDay series then you must know that we’ve been on a roll.  We’ve discovered so many words that we didn’t know existed.

Today’s word seems rather simple but the meaning is simpler. 

Hoax is a verb that means to trick into believing or accepting as genuine something false and often preposterous. It could also mean something accepted or established by fraud or fabrication.

Here are a few words that are similar in meaning to hoax: Trick, Jest, Prank, Delude. 

Look at a few examples ;

The bomb threat is probably a hoax, but we should still evacuate the building.

She was the victim of a cruel hoax.

#PickOfTheWeek – It’s the little things

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We have four brilliant writers on today’s #PickOfTheWeek and each of them focused on seemingly small issues that have weighty consequences. 

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Adenike Bamigbade talks about something that which although doesn’t happen all the time can bring an indescribable amount of joy! No traffic on Lagos roads. Who else agrees with her? Truly these little things do matter. 


farmto tableDunsin is a fine writer who has a way with words. Here she describes writing in a unique way using rather mundane objects to illustrate, farmto table (1) A write to Love always gives a fresh insight about love and everything that has to do with it. This is a fine way of explaining love in its truest and most sacrificial form 


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We have never thought about the word crush like this before. Our writers are truly detailed people. But do you agree that it shatters like this? Don’t some graduate into true love?

#GrammarSeries – The difference between cannot, can’t, and can not


Hey Sparkle Writers, do you know that there is a slight difference between cannot, can’t and can not? Yes there is and we’d tell you all about it in today’s Grammar Series! 

Cannot” and “can not” might seem like they mean the same thing, but you use them in different ways. 


“Cannot” is usually the word you want. It means “unable to” or “unwilling to” do something.

  • cannot come to rehearsal tonight.
  • Mom said I cannot have the car tomorrow.

Can Not

“Can not” is occasionally used as an alternative to the one word “cannot,” but it shows up most often when the word “not” is just part of something that comes right after “can.” For example, use “can not,” (two words) when “not” is part of a “not only… but also construction.

  • You can not only be in the play, but also choose your understudy.
  • You can not only have the car, but you can also get the car washed on your way home.‘


“Can’t,” the contraction for “cannot,” is just a more informal replacement for the one-word form of “cannot.” 

  • Mom said I can’t have the car tomorrow.

 We trust that you get the difference now!  

Here are three reasons you should write what you think!

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At The Sparkle Writers Hub we have been coaching writers for a while and one of the most recurrent problems many writers face is the fear of writing what they truly feel, getting rejected because of what they wrote or being seen in a particular light.

So what do they do?

They hide, refuse to write again or clone another writer to be accepted. All of these are wrong. A writer should never hide his work and no matter how brutally honest you would be, somebody out there can handle it.

Here are a few more reasons why you should write what you think.

You’re not saying anything valuable when you pretend

Trying too hard to play safe only makes your work vague and void of depth. Say what you need to say, how you need to say it. Nobody is going to love that work if it isn’t valuable and soon, you’d fade out as a writer so it’s better you stop it now.

It’s boring

When you actually have a strong opinion about a particular subject and for some strange reason do all within your power to edit, cut and cut, you will most likely end up with something drab and uninteresting. Staying neutral to avoid offending anyone will result in words without substance.

It’s painfully obvious that you’re not being authentic

The more you try to cover up your lack of authenticity, the more obvious it becomes and most likely the more readers you will lose. People smell fake and restrictions from afar off and would leave. It’s best to avoid it. 

Here’s how to balance blogging and your day job perfectly


According to Technorati, up to 64% of bloggers are classified as Hobbyists and another 13% are Part-Timers. It would be good if every blogger could devote 100% of his/her working hours to blogging but realistically not all of us are full-time bloggers. 

Balancing blogging with your day job and your life can be quite difficult. After all, we have only 24 hours in each day and we have to spend at least 6 of those hours sleeping.

So how can we balance blogging and our day jobs perfectly? 


You don’t have to do everything. You can outsource design, marketing and any other task that would steal your time.  Ask yourself what is the most important thing that you have to do on your blog? Create excellent content of course. If that’s all you can do, do that and outsource the rest. 

Carry a notebook with you. 


Sometimes you get an idea for an excellent post when you are at work, hanging out with your friends or when you just wake up. While you won’t always have the opportunity to write this post right away, you can jot it down in a journal. When it is time for your next blog post, you will have an excellent idea waiting for you. After all, there is nothing worse than a writer’s block when you there’s a deadline.

Enjoy time away from blog. 

This is probably the most important part. The blogging world can easily consume you. Having to think of new posts, updates for the blog and what’s going on on social media can be draining but no matter how much you love blogging it is important to step away from it and spend time with your loved ones, devote some time to your health and spiritual needs. This time away from your blog will give you more inspiration to create the most excellent and amazing content.


#TheSparkleInterview – ‘Birthing any idea is hard work and you have to do the hard work to birth it.’ Toyin Poju-Oyemade


Today’s interview is a bit different from the norm for so many reasons. We had the pleasure of interveiwing the delectable Toyin Poju-Oyemade. Although she has not written a book yet (because after this interview we knew we got a book title!) she’s doing something quite amazing for authors and the reading culture in Africa.  

Wondering what that could be? She’s the brain behind Chapters, a program that seeks to explore, understand and learn principles of life and living specifically through books. 

There’s so much wisdom and fun packed in one interview and  we KNOW you would love it. 

Hello. Can you please tell us who Mrs. Toyin Poju Oyemade is?

I am a simple young lady trying to discover and live God’s purpose for her life. I am a media person, studied Mass Communication from the University of Lagos. My passion lies in media, ministry and music and the key is to use those areas to touch and impact lives positively and for the kingdom of God.

What inspired Chapters? You could have done a show on music, why books?

For the longest time, I always knew I would have a show or shows. I had started that in the university and when I finished, I went into documentaries but I always knew I would have a flagship show for TV and the online space, I just did not know what it was. When I got married, I remember that my husband would ask me, ‘So what do you say it is that you’re going to do on TV?’ All sort of ideas had come up but I hadn’t felt that one thing that would at least be the first of many. 

Flashback to 2015 I was reading a book, ‘And The Storm Came‘ by Kike Mudiaga where she tells her story of how she went through the loss of her family members and came through. The pain and the story at that particular time resonated with me because it showed how somebody could have gone through so much tragedy and loss, especially as a Christian and still come out whole and complete. It was a time in my life I was thinking about a lot of things and I was also becoming aware of the fact that there seems to be a lot of tragedy, pain and loss in life and people seem to get lost in that space. This was someone who had gone through that and came out to say I’m still standing. 

I remember sitting down reading the book and telling myself ‘somebody needs to know this’, ‘how can I share this story?’ So I called a friend and that was when the idea of doing a show around books came up.  I remembered that when Oprah was doing her show she had something called the Oprah Book Club, a segment of the show where she would talk about a certain book and why people should read it and sometimes she would have the author on the show and talk about the concept of the book. So I thought to myself, ‘Okay, what you are doing is not really different; the only thing is that you’re just taking that part and turning it into a show specifically.’ I called a couple of friends and asked, ‘What do you think about a show on books?’ One or two people thought it was amazing, we went back and forth and came up with the name, ‘ Chapters.

There’s a saying that ‘if you want to hide something from an African man put it in a book.’ I do not like that notion and the truth is they’re so many things written in books that can transform our lives. I want Chapters to help people regain their reading culture and showcase Nigerian authors and books. 

To have a show on books you must be a reader! What encouraged you to start reading and have you been able to sustain it with your very busy schedule? 

I come from an academic family. I read Famous five, Secret Seven, Eze goes to school at a young age because reading was encouraged at home. Then I was an art student in school which involved a whole lot of reading. Besides, I believe reading is a part of my nature. I genuinely like to read. I’ve learnt that we are not as busy as we think we are. It just boils down to structure, lifestyle and balance. If you think the book is important you’d find a way to make sure you make yourself read. 

One thing we are going to try to do with Chapters as well is create a book club because you need to find a way to help people have structure I always say: ‘If it’s a chapter a day, you’re fine; if it’s a page of a chapter a day, at least get something in your brain, get your brain thinking about something. ‘

If you know that you don’t read, you can start with fiction and then you can read deeper topics later but it is important to read. There’s a reason why there are books, and there’s a reason why the Bible was written in book format. It shows that books are important.


What of people who were not raised to read how can they learn to read? 

First off, as long as you went to school you had to read. So nobody can say. ‘I don’t know how to read.’ You’ve just not rehearsed yourself in the practice of reading. I know so many people struggled through school because reading was hard but if they told you, ‘Open this book and 50 million dollars would come’ everyone would read! Sometimes you just need to find a compelling reason. If you feel reading is hard, audio books are available, just listen. Just start, start with something easy, start with a magazine, start with fashion, something fun. Just read. 

It’s easy to advertise an entertainment show. How do you advertise Chapters? 

Advertising Chapters is daily work, daily wisdom, and daily insight. We use social media mostly – Instagram, Twitter, Facebook, YouTube. I think one of the things that makes Chapters special is that every show is different because we’re talking about different authors, subjects and specific things that affect day to day living.

Season One had episodes on finance, wedding planning, leadership, teenage parenting and marriage. These are things that affect me and you so what we are marketing is not the show itself but the concept, the subject matter for that day. We are not just saying watch Chapters because it’s a show, we are saying, ‘Look 2019 is coming and we have an episode on leadership. Listen to this person’s take that may help you decide who you’re going to vote for.’ That makes the marketing more targeted and with social media you just have to find engaging ways to reach people.

The quality of the show is partly dependent on the the books you review. How do you select the books to read?

Selecting the books for Chapters can be interesting. For Season One I went to Laterna and Terra Kulture. We looked for books that spoke to specific issues, anything that concerned life and living with an interesting angle to it.  I read through all the books to have an engaging conversation with the author and to ensure that the values are values I support or want to adopt.

What would Chapters do to anyone who watches it? 

Chapters would educate you. We are an education platform, we’re here for knowledge dissemination and even if it’s not knowledge that you need now, there’s no knowledge gained in life that would not be useful to you. Chapters would empower you to make better decisions.


What’s your most interesting episode ever? 

All of my episodes of Chapters have touched me but one of the books I like is the book called Conscious Life written by Funmi Oyetunji. It seemed like she sought to write a book that answers all the questions of life from the day you were born till you die. The book is such a complete conversation, broken down properly till the end. All of my books speak to one area of life but this book tried to bring everything into one book and she did massive research. 

Zahra by Sola Aguda is another book and the only fiction book we’ve done. I went to Terra Kulture to look for books and one of the sellers talked about it. Fantastic one. How someone can tell a story about marriage and you’d be so educated? It’s simply an amazing book. Leadership by Dr. Maxwell Uba has also gotten so much traction.

What lessons have you learnt from birthing Chapters?

Wow, so many lessons! 

1 Birthing any idea is hard work and you have to do the hard work to birth it.

2. Believe in yourself and your ideas. I remember when I wanted to start Chapters and I told somebody who I regard as a mentor and he told me nobody wants to watch this. I understand people see the world from their point of view and I had to believe in my dream and although this person has become a staunch supporter, if I had listened at that time, we wouldn’t be here.  People did not see what you saw; so don’t expect them to respond to it the way you will. 

3. Money doesn’t answer all questions. Many times what holds people back on their dreams is that they don’t have money. When I was going to do Chapters, I did not have all the money I needed. I leveraged on friends, relationships and work I had done in the past. I borrowed cameras and other equipment from different people. I couldn’t afford to pay for them but I leveraged. Learn to build bridges in life and understand that no man is an island. The same way you’d need people is the way people will need you. There are people around you that God has given you to help you birth your ideas. I got a space for free to shoot from someone whom I had volunteered with for free for seven years. You have to sow good seeds.


4. Sometimes the birthing of a dream can be tiring. I remember when we shot the first stage of Chapters, we had done nine episodes and I was tired emotionally exhausted. I was reading books so I was physically exhausted and because I didn’t have money to pay everybody, I was the writer, presenter, producer, director…everything. My brain cells were stretched. I was in a situation where they’d say ‘cut’ and I am thinking of the chapters I had not finished for the next episode. There was a time I had a shoot that morning and I hadn’t finished reading the book and I just told my husband, ‘You know what, I can’t even lie. I haven’t finished reading this book. Just read and tell me where I should focus on.’ 

I was financially tired and I almost entered into depression. We finished shooting and I couldn’t sit down with the editor. I was just like ‘who sent me message?’ The pressure of life is real, the excitement comes but can wash away quickly because the reward for work is more work. We recorded and now we had to edit. Some episodes were 40 minutes and I had to cut down to 25 minutes because it was on television. 

5. When you’re birthing a child everything that can go wrong sometimes goes wrong. It doesn’t mean it’s a foolish idea or you’re not called, it just means life happened. One Tuesday morning, two of our ACs packed up and the two episodes we recorded that day couldn’t be used. We were sweating throughout and we kept saying, ‘Cut cut cut’. That was part of my depression, money wasted. Luckily, we were able to call back the two authors. 

Shooting Season Two, it’s like the forces have said, ‘Even if the AC works, something else won’t work.’ The call time can be 10 am and we won’t do anything till 1 pm, but no matter the challenges, keep pushing. Your dreams will work. 

The reward for work is more work

If there’s a purpose behind what you’re doing you won’t end after one level of glory. 










#WordOfTheDay – Meander is not a difficult word


Hey Sparkle Writers, we are super excited to bring a new word to you this Wednesday. Before we continue, what did you do with last week’s word? Use it in a sentence if you haven’t done so already. 

Today’s word is meander. Wondering why we say it is not a difficult word? It’s because you have used its synonyms so many times. We just want you to get familiar with it too. 

Meander is pronounced /mɪˈandə/.

It could be used to describe a river or road following a winding course – zigzagwindtwistturncurvecurl. 

Meander could also mean to wander aimlessly or casually without urgent destination. In this case roam or ramble would be perfect synonyms. ‘

Here are a few examples;

My dog meanders round the street every night. 

The trail meanders through towering evergreens, over a river and beside a fountain.