This is how to be a confident writer

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One of the reasons many writers have not started blossoming is because they are not confident about what they do. Hence, they can’t tell other people they write, they can’t pitch their skills to clients or contribute when other writers are talking.

Confidence we know is not achieved in one day but every writer who wants to grow and move to the next level of impact in this industry must be a confident writer.

Insecure writers cannot go far. Although many accomplished writers have at one point been insecure, they had to deal with it.

Here’s what you need you know about building your confidence as a writer. 

Know that most people are insecure but that shouldn’t stop you.

Although they do not show it, many people are also struggling with insecurities. So don’t let your mind trick you into believing that you are the only one and cause you to go into hiding. You should never hide your gift from the world that needs it so dearly. Insecurity should not stop you from doing the things you love. You can always improve. The more you do them, the better you become.

Do great work.

The better your work becomes, the better your confidence gets. How do you do great work? Keep writing, and keep sharing your work.  By writing consistently, you are training your writing muscles and when you share your work, you get relevant feedback. All these culminate in helping you to become a confident and secure writer. Lack of confidence robs you of the potential to be the writer that God created you to be and make the impact that you ought to make in the world.

Fake it till you make it.

Maybe like us you hated that phrase the first time you heard but before you make your conclusions read till the end.

This is what we mean.

We know you don’t feel so secure about your writing skill but please don’t let it reflect every time you write. Don’t post on social media and delete after few minutes. Even if you don’t feel confident, act like you are and we promise you, soon enough, that confidence will begin to grow. 

The greatest writers are not necessarily the most courageous people. They are simply people who felt afraid but chose to write and publish their books in spite of the fear. 







#WritingQuote – “Your attitude is everything. Believe in yourself and trust your material.” Bud Gardner

“Your attitude is everything. Believe in yourself and trust your material. To be a successful writer, write every single day whether you feel like it or not. Never, never give up, and the world will reward you beyond your wildest dreams.” Bud Garnder

Can we just say that we absolutely love this quote by Bud Gardner. It mirrors one of the key messages we share at The Sparkle Writers Hub. 

You need to believe in yourself and your material. You might have the greatest writing talent but if you lack confidence and faith in yourself, we’re sorry to tell you that you won’t go very far. Someone with less writing talent but more faith and confidence will definitely achieve much more. 

To a very large extent, writing is personal. So it truly does hurt when people poke holes at your work and criticize you. We understand but that’s not a reason for you to fold up and give up. You must gather the courage to keep going even when you are heavily criticized. 

Write every day. There are no shortcuts to success in this game. Keep improving yourself. Read books. Put your work out there and most importantly, trust your material. 


#WritingQuote – “Write everyday of your life.” Ray Bradbury

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“Just write every day of your life. Read intensely. Then see what happens. Most of my friends who are put on that diet have very pleasant careers.” Ray Bradbury

There are three major lessons from this quote and we’d take each lesson one after the other. After this, we hope you will have a kind of blue print for what success as a writer is. 


Every writer has to do ONE major thing to deserve that title, write. If you are wishing you could write, thinking about writing or wondering how to write, you are not a writer. It’s that simple. 


Writers are readers. If you don’t like reading we are sorry to say this but you may not do very well as a writer. Writers read to relax, read to learn, read to get inspired and so many other things. Wondering what can make you a better writer? Reading is one of those things. 

The third point may be the most important because that’s one thing most of us are having issues with. 

Do it everyday!

Before you complain that we are asking for too much, remember that this is for your own good. If you however insist that you can’t do these two things – reading and writing CONSISTENTLY, then maybe writing really isn’t for you. 

#WritingQuote – “Style means the right word. The rest matters little.” – Jules Renard

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“Style means the right word. The rest matters little.” – Jules Renard

Have you read some books and wondered how the writer could write so beautifully yet you can’t point to anything significantly special in the writing style? This is probably because the writer has found a way to put the right words in the most appropriate spots to create magic, making it difficult for you to drop the book. 

This is an art every writer has to learn. Once you do this, your readers will find it easy to read your work and they’d love you much more.  There are a thousand and one rules that exist for writers to follow and sometimes trying to remember and fit all into your writing can be hectic. What you need to do instead is make sure you use the right words.  Avoid Clichés and be as descriptive as possible.

Use words that evoke strong emotions. For example, it is not every time a person cries, there are times they weep or sob. Differentiating these may just be what will make your writing fab. 

Once you get this right, the rest doesn’t really matter, 



#WriterSpotlight – “With words you can build, you can give hope, you can ignite and you can destroy too.” Aderonke Moyinlorun


She may be young but what she has achieved is incredible. Author of eight books, publisher and speaker, Aderonke  Moyinlorun is our guest on today’s #WriterSpotlight. Enjoy. 

Hello Aderonke. Can you please describe yourself in a few words?

My name is Aderonke Moyinlorun. I’m a writer, a publisher and a motivational speaker. I’m also the CEO of Starling Empire which birthed Starling Books and Starling Films.

At what point did you decide you wanted to become an author and why?

I knew I wanted to become an author since I was a child. I started writing short stories and poems when I was eight years old. I would write stories in all my school notebooks and I’d get in trouble with my teachers but it never stopped me. I’ve always known I wanted to write. I was born to do this.

You are a one-time best seller on Amazon. What book achieved this feat and how were you able to achieve this?

Yea, my book ‘When Love Hurts’ was an amazon eBook bestseller. I wish I could tell you exactly how I achieved this, but honestly, it was a bunch of different things that I did. The most important is that the story sold itself. It was my first attempt at romance story and if there’s anything reviewers say about my romance stories, it’s that they are emotionally intense, and heart wrenching. So I think the story sold itself as did every book I wrote after it.

Besides that, I did a lot of marketing. I gave out a lot of free copies. I approached well known book bloggers and asked them to read and review my book. And I did some few paid adverts. I also have the best and most supportive readers. I had a Ronke team on social media which consist of ten of my loyal readers  and their goal was to repost and share everything about the book. In exchange for their support, they are always the first to read my next book.

You have authored eight books! This is no mean feat. How were you able to achieve this?

By being disciplined, dedicated, persistence and patient. And also thanks to the fact that I never run out of stories to write. There’s always a story in my head all the time. But I do a lot of things and run a lot of businesses, I only have little time to write. If not, I would have more books than that.

Let’s talk about getting published. Why did you decide to float your independent publishing company Starling Book?

Honestly, there are more than one reasons why I chose to start Starling Books. First is I believe that my destiny is in my hands. That I can do just about anything if I put my mind to it. That I can be whoever I want to be if I work hard at it. That I can touch the skies if I’m willing to take the leap. More than anything else, this is why I like making things happen for me instead of relying on anybody else or any organisation. 

Second was that I had approached one or two publishing company and they rejected my manuscript because they thought I was too young and I didn’t have a lot of readers yet. They didn’t give me an opportunity, so I created the opportunity for myself. That was how I started Starling Books. I was barely 20 years old when I started.

What difficulties did you face in getting this company to start off and how were you able to overcome them?

I had a lot of difficulties. I was entering an unknown territory. I knew how to write but publishing was a whole different ball game entirely. I made a lot of mistakes. I did a lot of research and I had to learn on the job. One major difficulty that I faced was marketing. I was able to overcome this by always coming up with a new idea to market. And I realized that marketing is a continuous process. You are never done. But really, I’m glad I was able to get better at this publishing thing. 

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There is a common belief that getting a book published is expensive because of the different elements it involves. Is this really the reality?

I would say Yes and No. Maybe in the past, it was expensive. But presently, things keep getting better and I know they will continue to get better. We can publish a book as an e-book and people can read on phones and laptops. Last time I checked it cost zero Naira to publish an e-book, both on Amazon and Okadabooks. And e-book sales are really encouraging.

Getting a book in print used to be very expensive because you are required to have hundreds of thousands of Naira to print one thousand copies. But these days, there are print-on-demand printing companies everywhere. If you need to distribute fifty copies and fifty copies is all you have money to print, you can order the fifty copies. If you have money for another ten copies, you can order again at another time.

So, really, in my opinion, things are getting better. You just have to know where to look and have access to the right information.

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What advice do you have for a writer who really wants to get published but is low on funds?

Start with eBooks. It is completely free to publish an eBook. Don’t stop trying to get your books in print either. Work hard. Save. Approach people for sponsorship if you have to. Contact publishers. Good publishers don’t ask you for money to publish your books. They pay you to publish your books. Just keep trying. It will happen for you.

Can you tell us what you love most about being an author?

What I love most most about being an author is the opportunity to touch people’s lives and make a difference. I’m amazed by the number of people that send me messages everyday about how my books touch them. I find a sense of fulfillment in that.

What is the most important lesson writing has taught you?

Writing has taught me that words are powerful. With words you can build, you can give hope, you can ignite and you can destroy too. So I’m extra careful how I use words.

What do you love about The Sparkle Writer’s Hub?

What I love most about The Sparkle Writer’s Hub is the blog posts, especially posts that revolves around creativity and getting inspiration to keep writing.

Which author (dead or alive) would love to spend a day with if given a chance?

Aderonke Moyinlorun. Yea, I’m full of myself like that. LOL

What advice do you have for people who know that they have a message to share but fear keeps holding them back?

What you are afraid to do is a clear indication of what you need to do. Do it now.

Writing Quote – It does not matter if you are a struggling writer

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“It does not matter if you are a struggling writer or if your book is in its ninth printing. The only thing that is going to make you feel like a decent person, halfway decent human, is if you stop comparing yourself to other people and write what you need to write.” – Courtney Maum, Author of the novel, I am having so much fun without you.

The comparison trap is one that writers are familiar with. There is this nagging unwholesome temptation to always want to compare yourself with the next writer just so you can tell if you measure up or if you are good enough. God help you if you fall into that temptation.

Well, the good news is this! No one is the standard for measuring how great a writer you are. Keep telling yourself how great you are until people’s eyes are opened to see your greatness. Successful writers have been through that comparison route before but they refused to stay there.

Comparing yourself with some other writer is not going to make you a better writer. You would lose yourself in the comparison game. It is going to make you engage in an unhealthy competition with a person who will, most likely, be totally clueless about the race you are hell bent on winning.

Like the quote above says, “Stop comparing yourself to other people and write what you need to write.” Celebrate your uniqueness as a writer. No other person on the surface of this earth can string words together like you would. Quit expending your energy on fruitless competitions, pick up your pen and write till you have no more words left in you.

#WritingInspiration – 8 Ways To Stop Feeling Like A Failure As A Writer

Hello Sparkle Writers. We know that sometimes you get discouraged especially when your work is rejected or your article did not have the effect that you hoped it will have. We all have those moments when we feel like we have failed but you should never let such moments hinder progress. 

Read this lovely article by Laura Tong. You will enjoy it. 

If you study successful writers, you will discover that one of their most defining characteristics is that they have all failed, sometimes multiple times: failed to finish novels, failed to get them published (assuming they did finish them), failed to make a living writing and even failed to carry on writing.

Those writers who succeed understand that to stop feeling like a failure and dare again, you need to re-examine your idea of what failure as a writer actually is and what it means to you.

Because before you can start to feel like a successful writer, you must stop feeling like a failed one. Here’s how:

1. Stop seeing failure as your enemy

When you fail, you need to know that it isn’t personal. Failure doesn’t wake up eager to single you out as its victim.

So stop taking a fail as a personal attack on you and your writing goals.

Treating failure as your enemy adds significantly more stress and conflict to the creative process. You need clear thoughts to regroup and re-plan. Don’t waste energy on how battered you feel from the blow of an imaginary adversary.

Instead, embrace failure as a friend, as an honest if brutal editor. Friends and editors tell you how things truly are so that you can move on. They’re right there with your best interests at heart.


Realize that failure can be your greatest friend and most powerful editor – listen up and take note!

2. Stop thinking that failure defines who you are as a writer

You alone have the power to craft your self-image. The labels you define yourself by steer your every thought and decision. So you must choose only those that will serve you.

The self-portrait you hang in your mind will frame how successful you become.

Describing yourself by derogatory, disdainful, or disparaging terms will sabotage your every creative effort. Thinking of yourself as a failed author, screenwriter, poet or blogger will ensure that success eludes you, no matter how hard you try.

Realize that failure is an event, not a person. You may have failed three or four times to be published or to write that viral post, which means three or four decisions and paths of action didn’t work.

It doesn’t mean you don’t work, or that something is wrong with you, or that you’re doomed to fail in life. It absolutely doesn’t mean you can’t succeed next time.

Imagine if these authors had thought of themselves as failures and given up? Imagine all those works lost to the world!

Every failure brings the opportunity for you to decide that the act of failing won’t define who you are.

3. Stop confusing failure with weakness


As a toddler, you learned to walk by falling but also by getting up each time with an inch more knowledge of how your legs worked. You built your muscles, balance, and coordination through repetition, trial, and practice. The process of mastering the skills needed to be a successful writer work the same.

Not getting it right the first, fifth, or fiftieth time is not a case of weakness. Pianists play scales over and over for years, artists experiment with brush lines over thousands of canvases, and writers write…and re-write…and…you get the picture.

Failure is a critical step in learning what doesn’t work to get to what does. Most writers acknowledge that in the creative process. And it’s no different in all the other processes that add up to being a ‘successful writer’.

See failure as the adult version of falling down through lack of experience, practice, or knowledge – all of which you are on your way to acquiring. If you could have walked from birth, you would have defied the laws of human development.

4. Stop searching for excuses to quit


Failure only has one cast-iron ally — the act of giving up. Don’t listen to yourself or others who tell you it’s OK to abandon your dreams of achieving, doing or creating something remarkable.

Remind yourself again – just how few great works of art would there be in the world if their creators had quit?

Finding excuses to cut and run is always easier than sticking with whatever the road to success throws your way. Packing it in is way less effort than keeping on keeping on. You will always be able to find justifications to quit if you look hard enough.

And when you hit a bump or experience a curveball, such as writer’s block or your latest rejection, those reasons will seem all the more valid.

The most successful writers are those who refuse to quit, no matter how many times they’ve failed in the past.

And as a writer you have a double reason not to quit: not only would it rob you of the fruits of your creative labour, but it would also rob your future readers of the joy of discovering your work.


5. Stop convincing yourself it’s too late

If you’re still breathing, you haven’t missed your window for success as a writer. That’ll stay open as long as you keep trying. And as long as you realize that ‘it’s-too-late’ thinking is just another attempt to find a reason to quit.

Anthony Burgess didn’t publish his first novel until he was 39. And Toni Morrison may be a Nobel and Pulitzer Prize-winning novelist, but her first novel, The Bluest Eye, wasn’t published until she was 40. Here are some other late bloomers:

  • Helen DeWitt published The Last Sumarai at 41
  • Richard Adams published Watership Down at 54.
  • Laura Ingalls Wilder was in her mid-60s when she published Little House in the Big Woods (Little House On The Prairie came soon afterwards.)
  • Harriet Doer published Stones for Ibarra, at the age of 73.
  • Millard Kaufman published his first novel at the age of 90.

So if you’re under 100, stop using age as an excuse. And if you’re not, then go out there and make literary history!

Age is not a hindrance; it’s an asset. It brings a wealth of experience, ideas, skills, and knowledge that youth could never provide.

6. Stop crying over decisions you made yesterday

Thinking that your past creative failures dictate your future is a common mistake. Your past may have been shaped by the decisions you made, but your future is shaped by the decisions you haven’t made yet.

And while your past may also have been shaped by your creative failures, your future is just as likely to be shaped by your creative successes.

Rather than waste time and energy regretting your past decisions, you have the power to make new ones today. And the power to change your future by doing so.

Feeling like a failure is a result of being stuck in a loop where you imagine your future is held hostage by your past. In reality, your past has little hold, except in your mind. Break these mental chains, and see the past for what it is – a paper tiger with no teeth.

One great decision made today can set you free.

So celebrate your decisions regardless of the outcome because your reaction to yesterday’s failure will determine tomorrow’s success.


7. Stop thinking you are alone


Realize that missing a milestone, making a seemingly disastrous error, or taking a significantly wrong turn are all the experiences of successful writers.

Like you, they discovered that the road to success can take some unexpected deviations that might leave you feeling lost, confused, and alone. Even a successful first novel can be followed by a flop.

But they found the resolve to re-plan their route when they were knocked off course, just as you can.

Remember, you are far from alone when you fail. You are standing right where all the successful writers stood before you. You’re walking in their shoes and taking their path.

Stop feeling like a failure as a writer, and start feeling like a success because by failing you’re in the best company to succeed.

8. Stop believing failure is the end

Every action you take moves you forward, no matter how far backwards a failure may seem to have set you.

  • Have your novels been rejected for years by every major publishing house? Then treat it as a chance to self–publish. Amanda Hocking did – and sold over 1.5 million books.
  • Have you put your heart and soul into a blog post that was read by practically no one? Then re-work the title and have it go viral – Erin Falconer of Pick the Brain did.
  • Has your screenplay been rejected by all the major movie companies? Guess what? That’s right. It’s not the end for that screenplay, it’s the beginning.

See your version of success as being at the head of the road; what happens along the way is immaterial. It certainly isn’t terminal. Neither is it stronger than you.

Halt any thoughts that a single stumble is going to stop you. Or a dozen.

Refuse to accept that failure will get the better of you achieving your goal of being a successful writer.


Take inspiration from successful writers like Meg Cabot, best-selling author of Princess Diaries. She couldn’t lift the bag of rejection slips she kept under her bed, but she never gave up. Now she’s sold over 25 million books in 38 countries. Isn’t that fantastic?

Failure isn’t the end. Failure is just the chance of a new beginning, just like every first draft.

The end is success. That’s where your road leads. Keep on writing.

How to develop your self-esteem as a writer

This is how to handle criticism like a pro

Self esteem is one of the most important things every writer needs to succeed. As a writer you are exposed to all manner of criticism and comments from readers, editors, publishers or plain haters.

So how do you make sure all these negative comments don’t affect your self esteem and prevent you form doing what you love?


Good writers love and appreciate other good writers. Reading helps you to appreciate someone else’s gift and in return the gift that you have. Read about other writers’ achievements, their lives, what makes writing special and just be inspired.

Expect rejection

One of the things that can kill a writer’s esteem is rejection. It is always very disappointing to see negative remarks about your work especially after working so hard on it. Although it sounds weird, if you expect rejection it wouldn’t really hurt when it comes right?

This is not to say that you should not do good work. Please do, but don’t expect that everyone would love it the way you do. That way you are not disappointed. Even the best writers have their work sent back as unacceptable.

Get used to it. Editors don’t always behave rationally, and occasionally say things  like “This isn’t a good fit for us.” Don’t take it personal.

Learn to distinguish between constructive criticism and thoughtless remarks.

Be patient

All evidence and historical example shows us that it takes many years of rewrites and heroic perseverance to endure the writing industry. There’s no fast success. To get published, it’s essential to have realistic expectations about how long it will take.

Whatever happens in your writing journey should toughen you and encourage you to do more not to toy with your self esteem.

You have what it takes; now, prove it to the rest of the world because we believe in you already!

#WriterSpotlight – Jola loves to inspire people with her words

Jola Sotubo

Another Thursday is here and you know what that means; it’s time for another #WriterSpotlight feature! Today, we’re featuring Jola Sotubo, an inspiring writer who is doing great things with her talent. Read more about her in our interview with her.

Hello, please introduce yourself.

My name is ‘Jola Sotubo

What do you do?

I’m a writer.

Why did you choose to write or what led you to writing?

I developed a love of words from a young age. That grew from a love of reading to a love of writing.

What is your most challenging moment as a writer?

The first sentence is always the hardest, after that it usually flows.

Can you share any lesson you have learnt from writing?

I’ve learnt to always use my own voice.

Can you tell us your most rewarding moment as a writer?

I love inspiring people and restoring their faith in themselves and life as a whole.

If you didn’t become a writer what else would you have done?

Well, I’m also a lawyer and a photographer so I have a lot of options.

Have you ever been rejected as a writer and how did you handle it?

It was painful at first but I put it in perspective and learnt from it.

Will you ever retire from writing? No.

What do you do in your leisure time?

I read and listen to music.

What would you pick

  • Continental Food or African Delicacy? African Delicacy
  • R&B or Hip/hop? R&B
  • Fiction or poetry? Fiction.
  • Football, fashion or music? Music

Do you have a writing mentor? If yes why?

I try to sample as much as I can but Sydney Sheldon is a longtime favourite.

Your best article or story so far?

Angels among us. It was about my little brother and it came from my heart.

Last words for upcoming writers?

Your voice is unique, be guided by other writers but don’t lose your own voice.