#GrammarSeries – Grammar myths you need to get rid of

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Hey Sparkle Writers! We know that as a writer you would have read and heard so many ‘grammar rules’ – the ones that are true and those that are untrue. 

Today we want to debunk a few of those myths. Whose ready to unlearn and relearn?

Here we go!

Myth 1

You shouldn’t start a sentence with the word “however.” 

Wrong! It’s fine to start a sentence with “however” so long as you use a comma after it when it means “nevertheless.” 

The comma is important because however is a conjunctive adverb that can be used in two different ways: it can join main clauses and it can modify a clause.

If you use however at the beginning of a sentence and don’t insert a comma, it would mean “in whatever manner,” “to whatever extent,” or “no matter how.”

Myth 2 

“Irregardless” is not a word. 

Wrong! “Irregardless” is a bad word and a word you shouldn’t use it, but it is a word. You shouldn’t use it if you want to be taken seriously, but it has gained wide enough use to qualify as a word. 

Myth 3

Passive voice is always wrong. 

Wrong! In passive voice, the subject of the sentence isn’t the person or the thing taking the action. In fact, in a passive voice sentence, the actor is often completely left out of the sentence. An example is “Mistakes were made,” because it doesn’t say who made the mistakes. Your writing is often stronger if you make your passive sentences active, but if you don’t know who is responsible for an action, passive voice can be the best choice.