#WordOfTheDay- Guess what snow means

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Hey Sparkle Writers. Ready for today’s #WordOfTheDay? We know you think we made a mistake because of the word we highlighted in the topic but no we did not. 

Today’s word is snow. 

Do you have any idea what it means? Snow is a verb that means to mislead or charm someone with elaborate and insincere words. Who would have guessed that snow meant something different from what we all know.

Look at these examples

Politicians know how to snow the public into believing what they say. 

 

Don’t let people snow you into just any kind of investment. 

Now that you know what it means, use the word appropriately. 

#WordOfTheDay- Know what kerfuffle means

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Hello, Sparkle Writers. It is time for #WordOfTheDay and we are super excited to talk about today’s word. One of the reasons why is that we find the word quite interesting. It has a simple meaning but the word itself is what intrigues us. 

Today’s Word of the Day is Kerfuffle.

Kerfuffle is a noun than means a fuss or commotion, especially one caused by conflicting views. Quite simple right?

We’d give two examples and then it will be your turn to use this word in at least two sentences.

There was a bit of a kerfuffle during the meeting because the warring parties were present.

He apologized for causing a kerfuffle at the dinner table.

Now, it’s your turn. Try to compose sentences with this word.

#WordOfTheDay – Ostensible isn’t such a difficult word

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Its Wednesday and as you already know on The Sparkle Writers Hub, we learn new words today. 

You man have seen this word but ignored it because it looked quite difficult. 

Ostensible is an adjective that means outwardly appearing as such; professed; pretended. 
For example. His ostensible cheerfulness concealed his sadness.
Ostensible can also mean apparent, evident, or conspicuous. 
Let’s look at this example.
The ostensible truth of his theories could not be ignored.
Here are a few words similar in meaning to ostensible . 
Apparent, avowed, alleged, claimed, declared, purposed, feigned, seeming, outward, surface, professed, supposed. 

#WordOfTheDay – Do you know what abysmal means?

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Hey Sparkle Writers! It’s been a week since our last #WordOfTheDay post. We are back with another word ‘abysmal’

You may have heard someone use this word before but do you know what it means?

Abysmal is an adjective that means immeasurably deep or great. It can also mean extremely or hopelessly bad or severe. 

So if you hear that someone is abysmally ignorant

You can only tell the level of ignorance.

There are a number of words that are similar in meaning to abysmal

Bottomless, endless, extreme, deep, profound, unending, vast.  

We hope you can use the word before the next #WordOfTheDay series is due.

 

 

#WordOfTheDay – Learn what bemuse means

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Bemuse is a very very simple word. Have you heard it before?

It means to bewilder or simply put, to confuse someone.

Several words are similar in meaning to bemuse. A few of them are: puzzle, perplex, baffle, mystify, dumbfound, daze, lost, stun.

Here are two examples of this word in sentences

After listening to the confusing lecture, the college girl was bemused.

When reading, the librarian usually wore a bemused expression on her face.

We hope you can form your own sentences and share them with us in the comments section.

#WordOfTheDay – You can guess what mayhap means

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Are you as excited as we are for today’s #WordOfTheDay series?

Today’s word is ‘mayhap’. They say the word is archaic already but there’s nothing wrong in knowing what it means right?

Can you guess what it means by just looking at the individual words that make it up?

The word means perhaps or possibly. If you want to remember the meaning just by looking at the word then you can think of it as a short form for ‘may happen’.

Pretty easy right?

Now let’s consider this word in a few sentences.

Question : Do you care for a cup of tea?

Answer : Mayhaps a bit late

Please listen to him mayhap he can change your mind.

We hope you liked this post as much as we did.

#WordOfTheDay – You should know what a scapegrace means

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It’s Wednesday and as you know on The Sparkle Writers Hub, it is time to learn a new word.

Today’s word sounds a bit funny but let’s find out what it really means.

Scapegrace is pronounced ˈ/skeɪpɡreɪs/

At first glance, you might think “scapegrace” has something in common with “scapegoat,” a word for a person who takes the blame for someone else’s mistake or calamity. This is not it.

Scapegrace is used to describe a mischievous or wayward person, especially a young person or child; a rascal.

Let’s look at the word in a few sentences

Alex is a scapegrace, we don’t want him at the party. 

Discipline your son early, else he will become a scapegrace. 

Now that you know we hope you can use this word in place of words like stubborn or rascal. See you next week!

#WordOfTheDay – What does uncouth mean?

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Hey Sparkle Writers! On today’s #WordOfTheDay series we are looking at what uncouth means.

Uncouth is an adjective that means several things. We’d tell you all about it today and even give you a few examples.

Uncouth can mean awkward, clumsy, or unmannerly. Look at this example;
Your brother is uncouth, he always embarrasses the family.
It can also mean strange, unusual and ungraceful in appearance or form.

My brother’s uncouth girlfriend does not realize she should close her mouth while chewing her food.

Have you used this word in a sentence before? You should try it.

Remember that if you don’t use the words you learn here you won’t remember them.

 

#WordOfTheDay – What’s a bully pulpit?

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Hello Sparkle Writers, how are you doing?

It’s Wednesday and another time to learn a new word.

Our word for today is bully pulpit. Do you think it sounds a bit strange?

We are going to tell you all about it

This term was coined by President Theodore Roosevelt, who referred to the White House as a “bully pulpit“, by which he meant a terrific platform from which to advocate an agenda.

A bully pulpit is a prominent public position or platform (such as a political office) that provides an opportunity for  expounding one’s views or speak our on any issue..

We bet some of you didn’t know this word existed.

Look at these sentences:

He used the presidency as a bully pulpit and got the child right law fixed.

I hope he won’t use his position as a bully pulpit to spread his wrong ideals 

Now that you’ve seen these examples, can yo form your own sentences with bully pulpit?

We’d love to see what you come up with.

 

#WordOfTheDay – Have you heard of foreboding?

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It’s another #WordOfTheDay feature and today’s word is foreboding.

Ever heard of it before? It is pronounced /fɔːˈbəʊdɪŋ/. It means having a feeling that something bad will happen. or showing a sign of evil or calamity to come.

The following words can be used in place of foreboding: apprehension, anxiety, baleful, doomy, ominous, ill, ill-boding, inauspicious, minatory, dire, direful, portentous, sinister, threatening.

Look at these examples;

I have this strange foreboding that he would lose the race.

Some people think that black birds are a foreboding of evil.

Sola wrote the note with a sense of foreboding

Now that you know the meaning of this word we hope you’d use it when next you have the opportunity.