#WordOfTheDay – This is what idyllic means

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Our word for today is…‘Idyllic’

It is pronounced as [ahy-dil-ik].

It is an adjective meaning extremely happy, peaceful, or picturesque.

The synonyms of the word are wonderful, peaceful, perfect, ideal.

Examples:

The idyllic setting had a therapeutic effect on her health.

The ranch owned by Mr. Laser is idyllic.

 

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#WordOfTheDay – Olid may be an old word but it is still relevant

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Sour, foul, decomposing, offensive. What do they have in common? They are synonyms for our #WordOfTheDay. 

Can you guess what it is? Let’s give you another hint. It is an old word and is hardly used. 

Our Word of The Day is Olid

Ever heard the of word before? It is pronounced as [O-lid].

Olid is an adjective that means foul-smelling or evil-smelling.

Here are a few examples;

The damp rug gave off an olid smell.

The public toilet in my area is naturally olid.

#WordOfTheDay – Ever heard of groggy?

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Hey Sparkle Writers, we hope you are loving this segment as much as we are.  The word for today is ‘groggy’

It is pronounced as [GROG-ee]. It is an adjective that means dazed; weak or unsteady as from lack of sleep, tiredness, sickness, intoxication, etc.

The word has a weird origin or etymology. It came from the nickname of Admiral Edward Vernon (1684-1757), who ordered diluted rum to be served to his sailors (and thus helped coin the term grog). The admiral earned the nickname from his habit of wearing a grogram cloak. Grogram is a coarse fabric of silk, wool, mohair, or a blend of them.

Examples:

The drugs made her groggy

There was more than enough alcohol to make a full grown person groggy.

The series of sleepless nights made Adams groggy.

 

#WordOfTheDay – In case you did not know what sublime means

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Who’s ready to learn tons of new words this year?

Leggoo!

Our #WordOfTheDay is “Sublime

It can be pronounced this way: [suh-blahym].

This word has several meanings but we would focus on the meaning of the word when it is being used as an adjective.

As an adjective it means very beautiful or good: causing strong feelings of admiration or wonder. It could also mean complete or extreme.

The origin of the word is from the Latin word sublimis, meaning high, elevated.

The synonyms for the word are ‘magnificent’ ‘astounding’ ‘amazing’ wonderful’ ‘fabulous’ ‘miraculous’

Examples:

The story of the birth of Jesus is so sublime.

Paradise Lost by John Milton is sublime poetry.

The actress’ attitude towards the crew is so sublime.

 

 

 

 

 

 

#WordOfTheDay – Learn what Quaggy means

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Hello Sparkle Writers, we hope you’ve been using the new words on this section of the blog? Today’s word is “Quaggy” pronounced / KWAG-ee/.

Can you guess what it means?

It is an adjective that describes the nature of something. It could mean marshy, flabby or spongy.

The word originated from the word “quag” (marsh) which has an unknown origin.

Look at these examples:

Ariana playfully poked at her grandfather’s quaggy belly.

The soil in our garden has a quaggy feeling when touched.

We would love to see your own sentences using this word. Drop them in the comment box!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

#WordOfTheDay – Edenic means

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Hello Sparkle Writers, ready for today’s word? Today’s word is ‘edenic.’ Ever heard the word before? Now, you have.

It is pronounced as /edInIk/.

The word is an adjective meaning; like a paradise, filled with happiness, beauty, innocence etc.

The origin of this word can be traced to the Hebrew word “Eden” meaning delight. Eden is the garden where the biblical characters Adam and Eve lived.

Look at these examples;

I plan to make my home edenic

“Though mariners had always avoided the uninhabited ‘Isle of Devils’, the shipwrecked colonists found it Edenic, teeming with natural resources and a temperate climate.” I Gail Westerfield; Bermuda and the Birth of a Nation; The Royal Gazette (Bermuda); May 30, 2008. 

#WordOfTheDay – We’ll tell you what descry means

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Hey Sparkle Writers! If you’ve learnt a new word via our word of the day post please let us know in the comment section. We want to know how well this segment is doing. 

Today’s word is Descry and no, it doesn’t have anything to do with tears.

Descry means to catch sight of, to find out or to discover. Who would have thought? 

Here’s the word in a few sentences;

After conducting experiments for several years, the scientist was able to descry the cause of the disease.

As a jeweler, he was able to easily descry the true value of the large diamond.

Because I wanted to descry my favorite actor at the movie premiere, I stood outside in the rain for six hours.

#WordOfTheDay – What does convoluted mean?

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Contrary to popular opinion, convoluted is not the past tense of a word. Convoluted is a word that means extremely complex and difficult to follow. This is usually used to describe an argument, a story or sentence. 

Here’s convoluted in a few sentences.

In hopes of confusing the jury, the lawyer made a convoluted argument which only a few people could understand.

Because the medical procedure is a convoluted process, it takes a very long time to complete.

There are a good variety of synonyms you can use as a substitute for this word, depending on what you’re describing or what you feel most comfortable using.  We’d highlight two of them.

Complicated 

Something having many different parts to understand

  • When learning something new, it can always seem complicated in the beginning.

Elaborate

Something that has a very complex design, or having many details to understand

  • The music the pianist composed, was simple, yet powerful and elaborate.

#WordOfTheDay – Do you know what tepid means?

 

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Today’s word could mean two different things and we will tell you what those two things are. 

Tepid is an adjective that could mean showing little enthusiasm or characterized by a lack of force. It could also mean moderately warm.

Here are a few examples of sentences with this word;

Don’t drink the tea any more; it’s tepid. 

I soaked my cloth in tepid water.

He didn’t like the applause it was tepid. 

Here are a few words that mean the same with tepid .

Lukewarm, warmish, slightly warm,  unenthusiasticapathetichalf-heartedindifferentcoollukewarmuninterestedunconcernedoffhandperfunctorydesultorylimp. 

#WordOfTheDay – Vituperate explained

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Hey Sparkle Writers, it’s time to learn a new word and that word is ‘Vituperate’.

There are two main definitions for this word. 

  1. To criticize or censure severely or abusively.
  2. To use harsh condemnatory language.

The word is pronounced /vɪˈtjuːpəreɪt/ and is quite old. 

Here are a few words that mean the same thing with vituperate;

Against, attack, upbraid, berate, harangue, lambaste, reprimand, castigate, chastise, rebuke, scold, chide, censure, condemn, damn, denounce, find fault with, run down, take to, task, vilify, denigrate, calumniate, insult, abuse, curse, slander, smear.

Now let’s form a few sentences from this word. We expect that you’d do the same. 

To vituperate someone is almost as bad as assaulting them physically.

Because the coach continued to vituperate his team with abusive talk, he was given a warning by the college dean.

It is not illegal to vituperate someone, but speaking to a person in such an insulting way is frowned upon