#WordOfTheDay – Lagniappe is a such an easy word

Medieval

Hello Sparkle Writers, it’s Wednesday! Today’s word is one of the easiest word to pronounce but for some reason it looks really complex especially if you are just hearing it for the first time. See why you need to keep following our word of the day posts? There’s always something new to add to your vocabulary.

Lagniappe is pronounced  /lăn′yəp, lăn-yăp′/.

It means a small gift given to a customer by a merchant at the time of a purchase. Broadly, it is something given or obtained gratuitously or by way of good measure.

Let’s look at some examples. 

  • The waiter added a cup of lobster bisque as a lagniappe to the meal.
  • As a loyal customer I requested for a lagniappe when I visited during Christmas.
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#WordOfTheDay – Vituperate explained

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Hey Sparkle Writers, it’s time to learn a new word and that word is ‘Vituperate’.

There are two main definitions for this word. 

  1. To criticize or censure severely or abusively.
  2. To use harsh condemnatory language.

The word is pronounced /vɪˈtjuːpəreɪt/ and is quite old. 

Here are a few words that mean the same thing with vituperate;

Against, attack, upbraid, berate, harangue, lambaste, reprimand, castigate, chastise, rebuke, scold, chide, censure, condemn, damn, denounce, find fault with, run down, take to, task, vilify, denigrate, calumniate, insult, abuse, curse, slander, smear.

Now let’s form a few sentences from this word. We expect that you’d do the same. 

To vituperate someone is almost as bad as assaulting them physically.

Because the coach continued to vituperate his team with abusive talk, he was given a warning by the college dean.

It is not illegal to vituperate someone, but speaking to a person in such an insulting way is frowned upon

#WordOfTheDay – You may not know this but Ensconce is a word

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There are some words we see and we are sure we could not have imagined they were real. Ensconce is one of those words. What’s more surprising is its meaning. This is the reason for the #WordOfTheDay segment. To keep improving our vocabulary. 

Ensconce is pronounced /ɪnˈskɒns,ɛnˈskɒns/

It has two widely known meanings. The first is to place or hide securely . It also means to establish or settle firmly in a safe place. 

Here are a few words that could mean the same thing with ensconce. 

Settleinstallestablishparkshutplantlodgepositionseatentrenchshelternestle, curl up, snuggle up; 

Let’s use this word in some examples . 

My grandfather is ensconced in the armchair and waiting for the first grandchild to arrive.

Clara is comfortably ensconced in a beach chair and has no immediate plans to return to work.

Ensconced on the mantle, the kitten refused to jump into my arms.

 

 

#WordOfTheDay – Uberty means…

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It is indeed fascinating how that the deletion of a particular letter from a word can change the entire meaning of the word forever. If you delete the letter ‘p’ from the word ‘puberty,’ you are going to get the word ‘uberty’ which is our word for today. And the meaning of ‘uberty’ is not even remotely related to the word ‘puberty.’

Uberty is a noun pronounced as /ju:b∂ti/. It is used to mean abundance or fruitfulness. It originated from the Latin word uber (rich, fruitful, abundant).

Here is how it is used in a sentence.

“Uberty comes from uncompromising strife or drive to achieve superior outcomes for the relationships.”

 

#Word of the Day – This is what ‘Mythomania’ means

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Hey Sparkle Writers! It is time to add one more word to your dictionary.

We came across this fabulous word and we thought it would be nice if you use it to spice up your writing. The word is “Mythomania” and it is pronounced this way /mɪθə(ʊ)ˈmeɪnɪə/.

Mythomania is a noun. It is an abnormal or pathological tendency to lie or exaggerate. Yes, there is a word for it. 

The word itself can actually be broken down into two constituents: Myth + mania.

The word has an origin. It is from the Greek “mythos (myth)” and “-mania (excessive enthusiasm or craze).”

Here is how the word is used in sentences:

John was taken to the hospital for another session with the psychiatrist. He was diagnosed with mythomania last year.

 

 

#Word of the Day – Let’s talk about what misanthrope means

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Hey there!

Today, our interesting word is “misanthrope.” If you look really closely at this word, you can tell that it is related to the word “anthropology” which means the study of humans. The word “misanthrope” is pronounced /mis∂nƟ∂up/.

Misanthrope is a noun used to refer to a person who hates all mankind and humanity in general. This is a formal word, derived from Greek misanthrōpos “hating mankind” from misein “to hate” plus anthrōpos “a man.” From the same root, we get the English word anthropology.

If you make a statement or do something that is particularly hostile or untrusting, you can call that misanthropic.

Here is how it is used in sentences.

Examples:

 I do not know of any sane person who would publicly declare himself a misanthrope.

Do not be deceived into thinking that a misanthrope could have genuine love for you.

 

#WordOfTheDay – A bugbear means …

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We have a new word for you Sparkle Writers. The word ‘bugbear’ is a peculiar word pronounced as /bᴧgbe∂r/. It is a noun used to mean a source of fear, anger, anxiety or annoyance.

The word has an origin and it goes thus: A bugbear is an imaginary creature, invoked to frighten unruly children. From bug (hobgoblin) + bear, from Old English bera, ultimately from the Indo-European root bher– (bright, brown), which also gave us brown, bruin, brunet/brunette, burnish, and berserk. Its earliest documented use was in the year 1552.

Here is how the word is used in a sentence;

The biggest bugbear is the guideline against the use of phones within the school premises.

See you next week with another new word. 

Word of the Day – Jekyll and Hyde

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Ever heard of the word Jekyll and Hyde? The fascinating thing is that it exists!

The word is pronounced /ʤekl ∂n haid/.

Jekyll and Hyde is a noun. It is used to refer to a person who is sometimes very pleasant (Jekyll) and sometimes very unpleasant (Hyde) or who leads two very separate lives.

This unusual word has an origin. It found its way into the dictionary from the story by Robert Louis Stevenson, The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde, in which Dr Jekyll takes a drug which separates the good and bad sides of his personality into two characters. All the negative characters go to Mr Hyde.

Here is how the word is used in a sentence;

Jack is a difficult person to live with because of his Jekyll and Hyde attitude.

I couldn’t explain her sudden Jekyll and Hide personality, either.

 

 

 

 

#WordOfTheDay – This is what confabulate means

Hey Sparkle Writers! How about adding another word to our vocabulary today? 

Today’s word is Confabulate

It means two things; Tto converse informally or to chat with someone. 

For instance;

My teacher and I confabulate often. 

She could be heard on the telephone confabulating with someone.
 
Yeah we know, all that big grammar just to say chat 😊

Confabulate could also mean to fabricate imaginary experiences as compensation for loss of memory.

Look at this example;

She has lapses in attention and concentration—she may be confabulating a little.

That’s it for today. Remember that every Wednesday on The Sparkle Writer’s Hub we have a new word here. See you next week. 

 

#GrammarSeries – Rifle and riffle mean the same thing except for a slight difference

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It is #GrammarSeries on the Sparkle Writer’s Hub blog today and we want to learn about the difference between two words; Rifle and Riffle. 

When you’re riffling, you’re hastily flipping through something or shuffling cards by interlacing them. 

Although the Oxford English Dictionary says the origin of “riffle” is uncertain, one theory is that it’s a blend between “ripple” and “ruffle.”

Here’s an example of how you’d use “riffle”:

As she riffled through the drawer, she found a hidden note.

The wind can also riffle your hair or riffle water to create riffles or ripples.

When you’re rifling, you’re searching frantically or ransacking, usually meaning to steal something. “Rifle” is from the Old French word for “steal or plunder.”  We are sure you’d get the difference now.

Here’s an example of how you’d use “rifle”:

I could tell he had rifled through my drawers.

As a noun, a rifle is also a weapon.  A long gun that you hold up against your shoulder to shoot.