#WordOfTheDay – This is what idyllic means

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Our word for today is…‘Idyllic’

It is pronounced as [ahy-dil-ik].

It is an adjective meaning extremely happy, peaceful, or picturesque.

The synonyms of the word are wonderful, peaceful, perfect, ideal.

Examples:

The idyllic setting had a therapeutic effect on her health.

The ranch owned by Mr. Laser is idyllic.

 

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#WordOfTheDay – Olid may be an old word but it is still relevant

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Sour, foul, decomposing, offensive. What do they have in common? They are synonyms for our #WordOfTheDay. 

Can you guess what it is? Let’s give you another hint. It is an old word and is hardly used. 

Our Word of The Day is Olid

Ever heard the of word before? It is pronounced as [O-lid].

Olid is an adjective that means foul-smelling or evil-smelling.

Here are a few examples;

The damp rug gave off an olid smell.

The public toilet in my area is naturally olid.

#WordOfTheDay – Ever heard of groggy?

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Hey Sparkle Writers, we hope you are loving this segment as much as we are.  The word for today is ‘groggy’

It is pronounced as [GROG-ee]. It is an adjective that means dazed; weak or unsteady as from lack of sleep, tiredness, sickness, intoxication, etc.

The word has a weird origin or etymology. It came from the nickname of Admiral Edward Vernon (1684-1757), who ordered diluted rum to be served to his sailors (and thus helped coin the term grog). The admiral earned the nickname from his habit of wearing a grogram cloak. Grogram is a coarse fabric of silk, wool, mohair, or a blend of them.

Examples:

The drugs made her groggy

There was more than enough alcohol to make a full grown person groggy.

The series of sleepless nights made Adams groggy.

 

#WordOfTheDay – This is what Senectitude means

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Hey Sparkle Writers, our word for today is pretty simple – ‘Senectitude’.

The word looks really serious but it is not as serious as it looks.

First, it is pronounced this way [si-NEK-ti-tood]. It sure does sound nice, doesn’t it?

It is a noun meaning old age (We told you it was not that serious).

The origin of the word is from the Latin word ‘senectus’ meaning old.

Examples:

Senectitude comes with its own fair share of problems.

It is high time people embraced the reality of senectitude.

 

#WordOfTheDay – Learn what malign means

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We see that more people are checking out the WordOfTheDay series! Nice.

Our word for today is ‘malign.’ Who has heard it before? It’s a pretty simple word and is pronounced as /muh-lahyn/.

Malign is both a verb and an adjective. As a verb, it means to speak evil of someone or to defame someone while as an adjective, it means having or showing an evil disposition. 

Here are examples of this word in sentences;

It is wrong for that editor to malign an honorable man.

No one would have thought that the president was a part of that malign conspiracy.

Is there a word you want us to talk about? Drop it in the comment section.

 

 

 

 

 

#WordOfTheDay – In case you did not know what sublime means

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Who’s ready to learn tons of new words this year?

Leggoo!

Our #WordOfTheDay is “Sublime

It can be pronounced this way: [suh-blahym].

This word has several meanings but we would focus on the meaning of the word when it is being used as an adjective.

As an adjective it means very beautiful or good: causing strong feelings of admiration or wonder. It could also mean complete or extreme.

The origin of the word is from the Latin word sublimis, meaning high, elevated.

The synonyms for the word are ‘magnificent’ ‘astounding’ ‘amazing’ wonderful’ ‘fabulous’ ‘miraculous’

Examples:

The story of the birth of Jesus is so sublime.

Paradise Lost by John Milton is sublime poetry.

The actress’ attitude towards the crew is so sublime.

 

 

 

 

 

 

#WordOfTheDay – Learn what Timbuktu means

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Our word for today is a weird word. You might actually be tempted to think that such a word is not in the dictionary but it exists. That’s the beauty of the #WordOfTheDay segment.

The word is “Timbuktu” and it is pronounced as /tim-buk-TOO/

It is a noun that simply means a remote place. However, the name originated from the name of a town in central Mali, West Africa.

Examples:

The restaurant was located in Timbuktu.

She was so exhausted that she parked her car in Timbuktu.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

#WordOfTheDay – Learn what Quaggy means

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Hello Sparkle Writers, we hope you’ve been using the new words on this section of the blog? Today’s word is “Quaggy” pronounced / KWAG-ee/.

Can you guess what it means?

It is an adjective that describes the nature of something. It could mean marshy, flabby or spongy.

The word originated from the word “quag” (marsh) which has an unknown origin.

Look at these examples:

Ariana playfully poked at her grandfather’s quaggy belly.

The soil in our garden has a quaggy feeling when touched.

We would love to see your own sentences using this word. Drop them in the comment box!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

#WordOfTheDay – Egregious is a word you should learn

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Hello Sparkle Writers our word for today is ……egregious.”

We thought to bring this word to your notice today. So, the next time you write, you can find a new way of expressing old concepts or meaning.

“Egregious,” is pronounced as / i-GREE-juhs/.

It is an adjective used to mean, “Remarkable in a bad way; Exceptional, conspicuous, outstanding, most usually in a negative fashion; outrageously bad or shocking.”

The word actually has an origin. It is from Latin egregius (outstanding). Earlier, something egregious was one that stood out because it was remarkably good. However, over time, the word evolved and today it refers to something offensive

For example,

The boy’s narrative was marred by a number of egregious spellings.

 

 

 

 

 

#WordOfTheDay – This is what cocksure means

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Hey Sparkle Writers! 
Our word for today is “cocksure.” It is pronounced as /KOK-shoor/.
It is an adjective used to describe someone who is arrogantly or presumptuously overconfident.
The origin of the word is cock (a euphemism for god) + sure, from Old French seur, from Latin securus (secure). Earliest documented use was in 1520. Yeah its that old. 
Examples:
I thought myself cocksure of the horse which he readily promised me. 

I do not like Mr Shawn he seems preety cocksure