#WordOfTheDay – Ever heard of Nimbus? This is what it means

Hello Sparkle Writers, we’re bringing you another word today. Our word of the day is ‘Nimbus’ which is pronounced as /nɪmbəs/. It means a luminous cloud or a halo surrounding a supernatural being or a saint.

Nimbus can also mean a large grey rain cloud. Have you seen one before?

These words are similar in meaning to nimbus; Aroma, atmosphere, climate, flavour, halo, karma, mood, aura, note, odour, smell. 

Let’s form a few sentences with this word.

There was nimbus in the sky, flying everywhere. Did you see it?

Fans are inevitably disappointed when the nimbus of glamour about their favourite celebrity turns out to be an illusion.

We’d be glad to see your own sentences, post them in the comment box.

 

#WordOfTheDay – Don’t know what ‘splenetic’ means? Read this

It is time to learn a new word Sparkle Writers! Let’s get to it. 

Splenetic, pronounced /splɪˈnɛtɪk/, means to be marked by bad temper, malevolence, or spite. In previous times it was a word used to describe melancholics. 

Look at a few words that have the same meaning with splenetic; bad-temperedill-temperedangrywrathfulcrosspeevishpetulantpettishirritableirasciblecantankeouscholericdyspeptictestytetchy. 

We’d use this word in a few sentences and wait to read yours in the comments box. 

These are our own examples.

I emailed the article to Glory, warning her to avoid the splenetic comments at the bottom of the page.

Matthew was splenetic after his wife left him for another man.

See you next week when we bring another word!

 

 

#WordOfTheDay- This is the meaning of Onerous

 

Hey Sparkle Writers! Did you know that developing a great vocabulary is one of the most overlooked ways to improve your life personally and professionally? This is another reason why you need to take this section of the blog seriously. 

Let’s get to today’s word. 

Onerous is an adjective pronounced /əʊn(ə)rəs,/ or /ˈɒn(ə)rəs/.

Onerous could mean that something or someone is involving, imposing, or constituting a burden or being troublesome. It can also mean having legal obligations that outweigh the advantages

Look at a few words that have the same meaning with onerous; Awkward, back breaking, burdensome, crushing,  heavy, inconvenient, oppressive. 
 
We’d use this word in a few sentences and wait to read yours in the comments box. 
 
 These are our own examples. 

Taking care of my puppy is an onerous task.

When I agreed to help my father cut the grass, I did not realize the chore would be so onerous.

See you next week when we bring another word!

#WordOfTheDay – Find out what inveterate means

 

We love it when we have the opportunity to learn new words. It is even better when we get to share those words with you! It’s time for our #WordOfTheDay on The Sparkle Writer’s Hub.

Today’s word is ‘inveterate’. Inveterate is an adjective that is pronounced /ɪnˈvɛt(ə)rət/. Ever heard of this word? 

It means to have a particular habit, activity, or interest that is long-established and unlikely to change. 

Look at these examples:

Politicians are inveterate liars.

I am an inveterate writer, what about you?

Find ways to use this word in a sentence this week. See you next week when we will have a new word for you.

#WordOfTheDay – Here’s What ‘Propitious’ Means

It’s time to learn a new word on The Sparkle Writer’s Hub!

The word we have for you today is ‘Propitious’.

Propitious is an adjective that is pronounced, /prə-ˈpi-shəs/. Derived from the Latin word, ‘propitius’, it means to be favourably disposed or giving/ indicating a good chance of success.

Here’s how to use ‘Propitious’ in a sentence;

1. Now is a propitious time to start a business.

2. The success of the first big movie in May was a propitious start for the summer season of blockbusters.

We hope you will use this word in a sentence soon. 

#WordOfTheDay – This is what ‘Finifugal’ means

Hey there, Sparkle Writers. It’s time for Word of The Day. Today’s word is ‘Finifugal#. Can you guess what it means? 

Finifugal is an adjective used to describe someone who hates endings or someone who tries to avoid or prolong the final moment of a story, relationship, or some other journey 

Here’s how to this word in a sentence;

  • As a writer, one cannot afford to be finifugal. Every story must come to an end.
  • Hopeless romantics tend to be finifugal.

Find ways to use this word in a sentence this week. See you next week when we will have a new word for you.

#WordOfTheDay – Today’s word will blow your mind

Hello Sparkle writers, we are back with more vocabulary and today’s word is just amazing. Can you guess what it is? 

Today’s word is ‘Woebegone.’ Yes, it is a word!  It is an adjective that means affected by grief or woe. It also means sad or miserable in appearance.

Let’s use this word in a few sentences.;

She looked woebegone, but nobody knew what was wrong.

I was surprised that bereaved didn’t look woebegone.

Would you form your own sentences with this word and share with us in the comments section? Please do. 

#WordOfTheDay – Guess what ‘Complaisant’ means…

It’s Wednesday and you know it’s time to learn a new word on The Sparkle Writer’s Hub blog 🙂 Are you ready?

The word we have for today is ‘Complaisant’. Pronounced [kəmˈpleɪz(ə)nt], Complaisant means to be willing to please others or to accept what they do or say without protest. This word should not be confused with ‘Complacent’ which means something totally different. 

Words that are similar to ‘Complaisant’ include willing, agreeable, accommodating, obliging, conformable, docile, assenting. 

Here’s how to use it in a sentence;

  1. This is the most complaisant child I’ve ever met.
  2. He went to join his apparently complaisant wife for Christmas.

Find ways to use this word in a sentence this week. See you next week when we will have a new word for you.

#WordOfTheDay – This is what ‘Chicanery’ means

It’s time to learn a new word on The Sparkle Writers Hub!

Today’s word has a very interesting meaning and the word is ‘Chicanery’.

Pronounced \-ˈkān-rē, -ˈkā-nə-\, Chicanery means clever, dishonest talk or behaviour that is used to deceive people.

Here’s how to use it in a sentence;

  1. He wasn’t above using chicanery to win votes.

  2. That candidate only won the election through chicanery

Pretty easy right? Try using it in a sentence today. 

#WordOfTheDay – This is what ‘Abstruse’ means

Hey Sparkle Writers! Are you ready to learn a new word?

The word we’ll teach you today is ‘Abstruse’. 

Abstrus has its origin from the Latin word abstrusus which means ‘put away, hidden’, from abstrudere ‘conceal’, from ab- ‘from’ + trudere ‘to push’.

Pronounced [ab-stroos], the word means difficult to penetrate. It can also be used to describe something that is hard to understand or is obscure. It’s quite a useful word right?

Here’s how you can use Abstruse in a sentence;

  1. Her subject matter is abstruse.

  2. you’re not the only one who finds Einstein’s theory of relativity abstruse.

When next you want to refer to something that is difficult to understand, try using the word ‘Abstruse’ See you next week!