#GrammarSeries – Here’s how to avoid the use of double comparatives and superlatives

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Hello Sparkle Writers and welcome to the first grammar series in 2018!

Today we are talking about an aspect of adjectives that people often misuse in writing – Gradable adjectives or in other words adjectives that have levels of degrees. For example:

nice, nicer, nicest.

The general rule for the classification of adjectives is into three forms (the base, comparative and superlative) are as follows:

When the word is made up of just one or two syllables, the suffix ‘-er’ can be added to the comparative form while the suffix ‘-est’ can be added to their superlative form. For example:

Poor, poorer poorest

Big, bigger, biggest

The above words are made up of just one syllable.

On the other hand, if the word is made up of more than two syllables, ‘more’ is added to the comparative form while ‘most’ is added to the superlative form. For example:

Interesting, more interesting, most interesting

Terrible, more terrible, most terrible

The words above are made up of three syllables each. That is why it would be weird to say ‘terribler’ or ‘terriblest’

Here’s something to note: avoid the use of ‘more’ together with the suffix ‘-er’ and the use of ‘most’ together with the suffix ‘-est’

This would make expressions like ‘more nicer’ ‘most nicest’ ‘more bigger’ ‘most bigger extremely wrong. It either ‘more’ or ‘-er’ and ‘most’ or ‘-est’

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